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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of impact of climate and technology on Soviet grain production found in the catalog.

impact of climate and technology on Soviet grain production

Felix Kogan

impact of climate and technology on Soviet grain production

by Felix Kogan

  • 351 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Delphic Associates in Falls Church, VA (7700 Leesburg Pike, #250, Falls Church 22043) .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Soviet Union.
    • Subjects:
    • Grain -- Climatic factors -- Soviet Union.,
    • Grain -- Soviet Union.,
    • Grain trade -- Soviet Union.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: leaves 175-178.

      StatementFelix Kogan.
      SeriesMonograph series on Soviet Union, Delphic emigre series
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSB192.S65 K64 1986
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 178 leaves :
      Number of Pages178
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2423482M
      LC Control Number87108682

      To estimate the effect of climate on Soviet wheat production, this study devises formulas that calculate variability of wheat production in three major areas: Southwest Ukraine, South Ukraine, and Kazakhstan-West Siberia. Weather conditions in these three areas have a major influence on the total production of wheat in the USSR.   Today, the Soviet Union's oil exports alone earn more than half the foreign exchange needed for purchases of grain and industrial equipment. As oil exports begin to decline, exports of natural gas.

      [Maggie Burke] Nikita Khrushchev’s Virgin Lands Program was prompted by the severe grain shortage of the early s. This was in part due to decades of misreported agricultural yields from across the Soviet Union (Dronin, ) and in part because the area, which had been occupied and destroyed by the Germans during WWII, had provided “between a third and a . Wheat yield dynamic in Canada, USA, Russia and Kazakhstan from till was related to air temperature and precipitation during wheat season to evaluate the effects of climate change. The study used yield data from the provinces, states and regions and average yield from 19 spring wheat breeding/research sites. Both at production and research sites grain yield in Cited by: 1.

      With the breaking down of the Iron Curtain and widespread talk of "perestroika" and "glasnost", the political system in the Soviet Union is presently undergoing profound transformations. A search for the cause of fatal mistakes during the production of biotechnologically produced artificial proteins show some indications of what can happen if decisions on science and . Abstract: Climate change is a major and lasting change and has impact on agriculture. This study presents research results on effects of climate change on crop production in Thaba-tseka and Mokhotlong districts in Lesotho. The main objective is to find out effects of climate change on crop production. Data on climatic.


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Impact of climate and technology on Soviet grain production by Felix Kogan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Impact of climate and technology on Soviet grain production. Falls Church, VA ( Leesburg Pike, #, Falls Church ): Delphic Associates, © (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Felix Kogan.

title: ussr: the impact of recent climate change on grain production subject: ussr: the impact of recent climate change on grain production keywords.

than Soviet requirements for grain. Climate and weather have been primarily responsible for this shortfall. Many statistical models based on weather and technology, their utilization for large-scale predictions of grain crop production, and related topic~ are described in this report. The current.

Agriculture in Russia has always had to contend with unfavorable climate. At the same time, large-scale socio-economic experiments have also strained the country’s food production potential throughout the 20 th century.

The relative role of climate and state agricultural policies in affecting production of cereals was studied for the period of –Cited by: 4. climate change will impact the total cereal grain yield in Russia by % to -5% by depending on the underlying climate scenario. However, based on model allowing mid-term adaptation, the.

Climate change is already having a negative impact on agricultural production in Russia, especially grain production, since this sector is perhaps the most dependent on weather and climate factors. This report presents an economic evaluation of the impact of climate change on crop production at the nationalFile Size: 2MB.

Climatic Impact on Small Grain Production in the Subarctic Region of the United States B.S. SHARRATT,1 C.W. KNIGHT2 and F. WOODING2,3 (Received 5 July ; accepted in revised form 24 October ) ABSTRACT. The Subarctic comprises the higher mid-latitudinal regions with short, cool, moist summers and long, cold, dry by: 6.

(Archived document, may contain errors) I No r\\\\ The Heritage Foundation 21 4 Massachusetts Avenue N.E. Washington, D.C. () Janu THE INTRODUCTION SOVIET GRAIN.

Table Estimates of the feed grain available for peasants' livestock in the USSR,according to recent Soviet and Western data on grain production (millions of tons) Years. Grain production. Grain. Remainder of harvest. Remainder for feed (millions of tons) collection (millions of tons) Soviet.

Western (millions. High. Low. High. Sanitized Copy Approved for Release /12/ CIA-RDP86TR Directorate of G Secret. Using recent advances in statistical crop yield modelling and a unique dataset consisting of yield time series for Russian regions over the period from tothe study investigates the potential impact of climate change (CC) on the productivity of the three most important grains.

Holding current grain growing areas fixed, the aggregate productivity of the Cited by: 5. Wheat is a key global commodity in terms of acreage and tradeable value and as a staple in household diets. Many factors affect wheat prices including climate, yields, oil prices, lagged prices, and imports.

In addition to gradually and consistently increasing global wheat demand, these market drivers are posited to impact world prices and, ultimately, food by:   Reuters published an op-ed authored by Man Li on adverse impact of climate change on China’s grain production by In the article, Li argued seasonal drought could reduce yields of three major grains—rice, wheat and corn- with corn suffering the most.

Grain production in Russia, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan grew steadily between and following a year long depression caused by collapse of the USSR. However, in the summer of Russia and its neighbors experienced an unprecedented heat wave, accompanied by severe wild by: 5.

Countries comprising the former USSR harvested 18 percent of the global wheat crop inthe most sinceaccording to U.S.

Department of Agriculture data. The availability of Soviet agricultural statistical data at a regional level is extremely important in research on the impact of climate (mainly in the form of droughts) on agricultural production. Ideally there should be no interruptions in data sets for regions and years covered by the statistical reports.

Soviet Agriculture: A Critique of the Myths soviet78 [+-] geography and climate will always make Soviet agricultural performance volatile. Up until the expansion of Soviet output came primarily via an expansion of the sown area. Grain production rose from an average million tons in to an average million in.

“Average yearly grain production in the USSR during the past five years, as mentioned above, was approximately million tons. Thus, considering only recent years, the USSR has had an average shortage of grain of about 60 million tons per year.

But the gap between the production of grain and. We then determine how climate change affects grain production and efficiency using an input distance function and technical inefficiency model.

First, we discover a significant relationship between surface temperature and grain production, although this impact is marginal; the coefficient is in the estimated by: 3. Climate and weather influence crop production in different ways.

If a weather event that is fatal to crops takes place during the crop growth period, an indicator of the impact of the fatal event may be more relevant than that of growing-season mean climate to explain variations in crop production in that year. For example, the Missouri floods Cited by:. Domestic grain consumption is expected to increase by percent to million tons due to a boost in livestock breeding and processing of raw grain into products as starch or syrups.

Russia expects to control over 10 percent of the global grain market boosting exports by 61 percent to million tons.Climate change is already having a negative impact on agricultural production in Russia, especially grain production, the sector most dependent on weather and climate factors.

In anddrought caused a significant drop in grain production, which led to .Get this from a library! Climate's impact on food supplies: strategies and technologies for climate-defensive food production.

[Lloyd E Slater; Susan K Levin;] -- Global concern about the impact of climatic variability on food supplies has been growing since when a major crop failure in the Soviet Union ended a long period of abundant, low-cost surplus.